MINERS
UTEP Director of Athletics Accepts ALS Challenge

Director of Athletics Bob Stull


Director of Athletics Bob Stull
Aug. 15, 2014

UTEP Director of Athletics Bob Stull has accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from Louisiana Monroe Director of Athletics Brian Wickstrom.

Stull will have a bucket of ice water poured on his head following the Miner football team's practice on Saturday at Glory Field, at approximately 10 a.m.

"I'm happy to participate," Stull said. "A man I worked with for many years, Ray Dorr, was afflicted with ALS while he was the quarterbacks coach at Texas A&M and passed away in 2001. He was a great coach and an even better person. This campaign has been absolutely tremendous in creating awareness for this horrible disease. I plan to challenge [football coach] Sean Kugler tomorrow."

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as "Lou Gehrig's Disease," is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed.

In the last two weeks, the Ice Bucket Challenge has quite literally "soaked" the nation. College coaches, administrators and student-athletes have poured a bucket of ice water over their heads and challenged others to do the same or make a donation to fight ALS within 24 hours.

UTEP women's basketball coach Keitha Adams, softball coach Tobin Echo-Hawk and volleyball coach Holly Watts, along with her team, have already accepted the challenge.

With only about half of the general public knowledgeable about amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, the Ice Bucket Challenge is making a profound difference. Since July 29, The Association has welcomed more than 70,000 new donors to the cause.

 

 

For more information visit www.alsa.org.